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Welded Joints in Steel and Metal

Types of Welded Joints in Steel and Metal

Welding joints is a technique that requires creativity, attention to detail, and a lot of patience. Whether you are a welder or thinking about hiring one, having basic knowledge about various types of welded joints in steel and metal may come in handy.
Let us explore different types of welded joints that you may come across.

Welding Preparations in Plate

There are five types of welded joints in plates, which are

Square Joint

The square joint is a butt welding joint that combines two pieces parallel and flat. You can prepare a single joint very easily as it is simple as well as economical with ample strength. However, there is a limit to how thick you can keep the joint, i.e., up to 4.5mm.
If you wish to use a thicker square joint, you will need to prepare each plate to certain geometry to ensure adequate and durable welding.

Single V Joint

A Single V joint has only a single side with both sides beveled in a weld joint. This joint type is very strong because it uses a single wider V-shaped joint. Moreover, when you use a single-V joint for welding, the stress tends to bend the metal plate in a single direction as you fill the V-joint.
Therefore, you use a single-V joint to have its limitation, and you can use it for welding a certain thickness of plates. The maximum thickness recommended to use a Single-V joint for welding in the plate is up to 9.53mm.

Single Bevel

Double V joint works on a similar technique to a single V-joint. However, instead of creating a single beveled edge, it requires you to bevel both sides of the welded joints. This is the right solution when dealing with thick metal plates, and you can perform welding from both sides of the working plates.
The double V joint does not require a lot of filling material because you deal with two narrow joints, unlike broader joints in the Single V joint. Moreover, the two plates offer additional support against warping forces with opposing stress.
The optimal thickness of the metal plate for which you can use the double V joint is 9.53 mm.

Single Bevel

The beveling process involves preparing metal when welding seams. You create a slope on the edge of each plate by cutting it at an angle. The welding preparation sequence in single beveled welding is an ideal solution for almost any welding activity.
You can use single bevel welding to create cabinets as well as complex structures such as buildings, bridges, and other metallic structures. You can use this in welding pipes by preparing edges at the end of each pipe with a standard angle of 37.5 degrees.
The maximum thickness of the metal plate you can use a single bevel welding joint is between 4.76 mm and 9.53 mm.

Double Bevel

A double bevel is also known as a double V groove weld. In this type of joint, you weld both sides of a joint. However, there is flexibility for you to use two different angles while applying a double bevel joint.
Therefore, you do not have to match the angles on both sides. The maximum thickness of the double bevel joint that is suitable to weld is up to 9.53 mm.

Welding Configurations

Here are five common welding configuration types you can use on steel and metal.

Single V Joint

A Single V joint has only a single side with both sides beveled in a weld joint. This joint type is very strong because it uses a single wider V-shaped joint. Moreover, when you use a single-V joint for welding, the stress tends to bend the metal plate in a single direction as you fill the V-joint.
Therefore, you use a single-V joint to have its limitation, and you can use it for welding a certain thickness of plates. The maximum thickness recommended to use a Single-V joint for welding in the plate is up to 9.53mm.

Tee Joint

A tee joint is when you weld two metal pieces at a 90-degree angle creating a T-shape. Tee joint is a type of fillet weld, and you can use it to weld pipes into a flat base plate. However, it is imperative that you ensure adequate welding for guaranteed strength.
You do not have to prepare grooves for tee joints unless the base of the metal used is thick and there is excessive weight the weld must support. You can use a stopper to prevent any joint deformities in tee joint welding.

Corner Joint

The corner joint is somewhat similar to tee joints, with the difference in how you position the metal. As the name suggests, you place two pieces of metal pipes or plates at the corners to create an “L” shape. You can use corner joint welding in making boxes, frames, and other construction applications.
You can also use a corner joint welding to create V-groove, U-groove, J-groove, fillet, spot, edge, bevel groove, etc.

Lap Joint

You can create a lap joint by welding two pieces of metal together on top of each other, i.e., overlapping.
This is a common technique used for joining two metal or steel sheets with different thicknesses. Moreover, you can weld on one or both sides of the sheet. However, lap joint welding is prone to lamellar tearing and corrosion.

Plug Weld

Plug welding involves a round weld technique inside an existing hole. This technique is ideal when you want to weld several other pipes or metal pieces in a single piece. You can use plug welding to refill damaged holes in a sheet, plate, or pipe.
Plug weld is a common technique used in the aerospace industry. It is a process that involves several steps to repair the damaged holes and look as good as the original metal used. You may also need to do some machining in order to bring the welded component back to its original configuration

The Take-Away

This was a brief summary of several types of welding joints you can use in steel and metal. However, each of these types requires careful designing and engineering to achieve the desired results. Our advice is always seek advice from an experienced welder.
Contact MorFabrication for all your fabrication and welding needs in your area.